My Bedside Book Mountain

My bedside book mountain is really getting out of hand. Yesterday I bought two new books instead of picking up one of the million unread books lying around my apartment. Pitiful. But they both looked so good and I needed them on my shelf! To be honest, that’s probably a lie, but whatever. Anyway, I thought I would share with you some of the books I’m working my way through at the moment. I wish that I were more disciplined and could read just one book at a time, but I have a bad habit of picking up new books at random, discarding ones that don’t interest me, and most unfortunately, buying new ones instead of going to the library or reading what I already have.

1. The Story of a New Name – Elena Ferrante

I picked up My Brilliant Friend a couple of weeks ago and absolutely adored it (you can find my review here). The characters are wonderfully complex, the writing is so fierce and vibrant, and the story is very gripping. Needless to say, it took me less than 24 hours to buy the second book in the series after finishing the first. So far I am enjoying it immensely and to be honest, I think it might even be better than the first. I have definitely been converted.

2. The Hate Race – Maxine Beneba Clarke

I am also currently reading Maxine Beneba Clarke’s powerful and harrowing memoir about growing up black in Australia. I’m not going to lie, this is a difficult book to read, but I think that it is a very important book for Australians at this time. To be honest, I have neglected this one a little just because it is so depressing – the blatant and cruel racism that Maxine describes really makes my stomach squirm – but I definitely plan on finishing it soon.

3. The Hidden Life of Trees – Peter Wohlleben

Now for something completely different – The Hidden Life of Trees! In this book, Peter Wohlleben shares his deep love of trees and forests and explains the amazing scientific processes of life, death, and regeneration he has observed in the woodland. He argues that much like human families, tree parents live together with their children, communicate with them, and support them as they grow, sharing nutrients with those who are sick or struggling and creating an ecosystem that mitigates the impact of extremes of heat and cold for the whole group. As a result of such interactions, trees in a family or community are protected and can live to be very old. I’m only a couple of chapters in (this is my go-to lunch break read at work), but I still can’t figure out whether this guy is a treehugging nut case or a total genius. Will have to wait and see.

Which books are on your bedside book mountain? Have you read any of these? Do you have any recommendations? 

~Anna

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Anna

Anna. Melbourne. Bookseller. Student. Serial tsundokist.

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